1. "Earth Spirit"

    A sensual Earth spirit. She represents the element of Earth- grounding, nurturing, fertile.  Earth’s nature is patient, steadfast, practical and wise. It symbolizes the material, the body, our Mother Planet, fertility and stability.

    “The earth does not belong to us. We belong to the earth.”
                                             ― Chief Seattle, The Chief Seattle’s Speech 

    "Air Spirit"

    An ecstatic Air spirit soars aloft. She represents the element of Air- expansive, enveloping, essential to Life. Air’s nature is fresh, cleansing, communicative and uplifting. It symbolizes the immaterial, the soul, the breath, the intellect, and freedom.

    “I would like to be the air that inhabits you for a moment only. I would like to be that unnoticed and that necessary.”   ― Margaret Atwood

    "Water Spirit"

    A serene Water spirit. She represents the element of Water - quenching, cleansing, essential to Life.  Water’s power is pure, fluid, flexible, soothing and deep.  It is symbolizes the subconscious, intuition and adaptability.

    "Water, thou hast no taste, no color, no odor; canst not be defined, art relished while ever mysterious. Not necessary to life, but rather life itself,
    thou fillest us with a gratification that exceeds the delight of the senses.”


    “Water is fluid, soft, and yielding. But water will wear away rock, which is rigid and cannot yield. As a rule, whatever is fluid, soft, and yielding will overcome whatever is rigid and hard. This is another paradox: what is soft is strong.” — Lao Tzu

    "Fire Spirit"

    A fearless Fire spirit. She represents the element of Fire- passionate, assertive, transformative.  Fire’s nature is bold, independent, spontaneous and courageous. It symbolizes energetic release, change, high emotion, purification and rebirth.


    "O! for a muse of fire, that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention."  —  William Shakespeare

    Source/Art by: Cristina McAllister

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  2. It’s Thorsday…show your hammers!

    Source Daughters of Odin

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  3. We were here

    The Dance of Pagan Recovery: The River is Your Heart  April 22, 2014 By

    We affect and are affected by our work-mates, our animals, our food, our spirit- and blood-families, the trees and flowers, the river.  All these relationships include some form of give and take.  Is it more important for me today to have this talk with my coven or call my mom?  Do I go to make my offerings to the land or do I need to get those cages cleaned this morning?  Should I stay late at work again or do the writing for this ritual?  Can I just sleep in today?  It isn’t always clear how we will take care of all of our responsibilities, or even what are ours and what aren’t…

    But there are other reasons why we might do things differently.  We may hear another need calling out to us.  Sometimes that looks like being way-away from the herd, or maybe just up the river a bit.  Just far enough to where we can do our own thing and still hear the singing of our kin.

    Source patheos (good article)

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  4. Tree of Life

    Source Covenant of the Goddess  

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  5. The Beltane Fire Festival is an annual festival marking the arrival of Summer held on the top of Calton Hill. It started as a free event and now attracts 12,000 people to the pantheistic procession with a huge cast of characters.

    But what is going on and what does the ceremony mean?

    The festival performance begins on the Acropolis after dark, where the May Queen, symbolic of the Earth, reveals herself from within her winter retreat.

    She and the White Women warriors greet the four points of the compass to begin the ritual.

    The Green Man, her consort for the year and symbolic of summer growth, presents himself and the procession starts off around the hill, guided by the druidic Blue Men and driven by pounding drum rhythms. The procession passes first through a fire arch. It then visits sites representing the four elements : Air, Earth, Water and Fire - inhabited by sylphs, goblins, nymphs and sprites respectively.

    Each group of performers joins onto the end of the procession until it numbers more than a hundred strong.

    As the May Queen’s court rounds the final corner to complete the circuit of the hill, they are ambushed by the mischievous Red Men, and their Beastie Drummers, who attempt to disrupt the procession with lewd and lascivious behaviour.

    The warriors’ focus proves too strong, however, and the Blue Men break up the standoff to allow the court to move to the stage.

    At this stage, the movement of the procession changes from counterclockwise to clockwise, indicating the changing season.

    The May Queen and the court spin on and around the stage and the tension mounts.

    The Green Man, overcome with expectancy, makes a grab for the May Queen but is dragged down by the four handmaidens, symbolically killed, stripped of his winter garb, and revived as a fresh green sapling.

    After an ecstatic dance of life and vigour, the Green Man and May Queen are married and summer can begin.

    The procession moves off to the bonfire, which is lit by the May Queen. A twin fire is created from the same spark by the Red Men, the Fire crew and the Beastie Drummers on the stage and the onlookers are then invited to pass between them and so be purified by the fire.

    Everyone is invited to place an offering on the fire to burn out the old. With the main ritual achieved, the court retires to the May Queen’s bower to rest and be entertained by the elemental performers.

    The last ritual event of the night takes place when the Red Men approach the bower and symbolically seduce the White Women into dance. Chaos and order are fused and the unity of all elements is complete.

    Source:  Edinburgh guide  

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  6. Dancing the Wheel of the Year

    Life, at times it’s both poetic and beautiful at other times it can bring you down to your knees with its challenges. Therefore, choose wisely. Pick friends who foster growth and help you along your journey. Don’t be sucked into people’s petty dramas. Don’t waste time or energy on crappy issues, people or situations, for these precious resources are finite, spend them wisely.”  ~  )0(   The Hedge Witches’ Grove

    Image: cafe press

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  7. Natural Insect Control for Your Garden By Harvey Ussery

    Who wants to eat crops that have been sprayed with toxic substances better suited to chemical warfare than food gardening? Here, learn how you can achieve 100 percent natural insect control in your garden by interplanting flowers among your food crops to encourage beneficial insects: …

    Encourage Insects in the Garden

    Plants, being immobile, make a deal with their insect buddies: food and shelter in exchange for moving pollen to other plants of their species, initiating production of seeds. Thus, the more flowering plants, the more insects in the ecology — and the more insect species, the more likely any overly successful species is going to be targeted as lunch by predator species. This simple law of population dynamics suggests establishing a balanced insect ecology as the key to preventing crop damage in the garden and orchard. Far from engaging in a “war on insects,” it’s wise to try to maximize the numbers of insect species, ensuring the abundant presence of species that feed on those insects with a taste for our crops.

    To that end, we should make habitat plantings of flowering plants — both annual and perennial, with flowers of all sizes and shapes, and in all parts of the season — as “discos” where ally insects can feed, boogie with others of their kind, and mate. The result is greater insect diversity, and a natural balance between herbivorous (leaf-muncher) and predator (bug-muncher) insect species. Our list of recommended Plants to Attract Bees and Beneficial Insects will help you support the “good guys.”

    Many beneficial insects feed on pollen and nectar produced by flowers. To support them, use a 1-to-1 ratio of habitat and crop plantings. That may sound like an extravagant use of garden space, but you can weave many garden plants into your insect diversity project. Here’s how:

    Instead of planting your herbs and flowers off in their own little fiefdoms, intersperse them among crop beds.

    Allow most soil-improving cover crops to flower, providing insects with nectar and pollen. Buckwheat, alfalfa and clovers, cowpeas, and even small grains shed pollen in preparation for seed-making.

    Fertility plants such as comfrey and stinging nettle, grown specifically for their contribution to mulches and compost heaps, support insect diversity as well.

    Allow green feeds for livestock, such as rape, kale, turnips, and fodder radishes to flower before harvest.

    Ground covers such as mountain mints, yarrow, and violets in the orchard can be chosen for the profusion and timing of their flowers. Ferns do not flower, but they do increase habitat diversity.

    Weeds — weeds!? They unquestionably played a role in my success. The “archfiend” dandelion, for example, is a dynamic accumulator of minerals from the subsoil, a nutritious green for people and livestock, and a pollen source that supports insect diversity…

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  8. Another Beltane activity!! Write your wishes on ribbons and tie them to a tree; they will flutter out to the universe on the wings of air. Leave the ribbon tied to the tree until your wish comes to fruition.

    Source The Whimsical Pixie

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    Tagged #Beltane
     
  9. Penguin Cafe's photo.

     

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  10. Plankton

    Photograph by David Liittschwager, National Geographic

    Seen under a microscope, a splash of Hawaiian seawater teems with plankton—tiny plants, animals, and eggs that drift in the ocean.

    national geographic news

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    Tagged #life